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Welcome to our National and International Criminal Law Blog

The three phases of extradition

Whether you are a citizen, an immigrant or a visitor to a foreign country, a charge of any level criminal offence can be a frightening experience. That said, international crimes carry additional complexities in the number of agencies involved and the details of the procedures that must be followed.  

The Federal Court of Canada will embrace virtual hearings for IP

Months into a prolonged COVID-19 shutdown, many organizations are exploring various tech-based methods to continue to operate efficiently. It shouldn’t be surprising, then, to learn that the Court is turning to virtual hearings in an effort to keep the judicial system moving forward. While various concerns centered on procedural fairness and information security have been raised, the Court has stated they are more concerned that continuing to delay will ultimately have devastating effects.

Falsely accused of domestic violence during divorce?

Even in the best of scenarios, a divorce is often marred by heated emotions and feelings of rejection. It is not uncommon, even if both parties claim to be in agreement over the decision, that hurt feelings can dramatically impact the course of a divorce or separation. In the most severe situations, one party will begin flailing, using every perceived advantage possible to ensure a beneficial outcome. Too often, men become trapped in a web of false allegations of domestic abuse.

Protecting your practice against misconduct allegations

Licensed professionals run the risk of severe criminal penalties and significant damage to their reputation in the event of a criminal conviction. These individuals must often fight to avoid penalties levied not only by a licensing board but the criminal justice system itself. License suspension, revocation or fines might be possible in addition to incarceration.

The Extradition Process in Canada

For many, being charged with a criminal offence is the first time a person really interacts with the law. Regardless of the reason – from minor theft to impaired driving – the process can come as a shock to those unfamiliar with how the courts and criminal legislation works.

This unfamiliarity can be made even more complex when it’s an international crime. Not only are Canadian legal principles applied, but so are those of the foreign country. An extradition matter can be quite complex, but there is a basic outline to how it works.

Leo Adler interviewed on CTV news national program discussing the case of Vice-Admiral Mark Norman

Mr. Adler was interviewed live during a televised broadcast for his expert opinion on the legal court case of Canadian Vice-Admiral Mark Norman. Mr. Adler's interview begins at 8:43 in the video recording.

A history of false criminal confessions

Accusations of police pressure and “coercive” means of getting a confession from a suspect is something you typically see on television shows. However, as life inspires art, there are very real cases of this type of behaviour in the Canadian criminal justice system.

According to an article posted earlier this year by the CBC, there have been numerous cases throughout Canadian history where a suspect has made an involuntary confession to a crime due to pressure from police.

What You Need To Know About Professional Misconduct

If you are facing a misconduct allegation as a teacher, your reputation, future employability and livelihood may be on the line. Cases of misconduct aren’t handled exactly like regular civil cases. One of the main differences is that the cases are usually heard in front of the accountable governing body. For teachers in Ontario, that body is known as the Ontario College of Teachers.

If an allegation contains a criminal element, like fraud or assault, then the accused may also face criminal charges outside of the college of teachers. But the general procedure to handle matters internally – meaning outside of the courts – is through a disciplinary hearing by the college of teachers.

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